Hi, friends! The good people at Rhythm & Bones published “Shadows Cannot be Seen in the Pitch-Black” recently. You can find the story here if you’re interested in reading it.

It’s been a tough year for the editors of Rhythm & Bones. As Tianna mentioned in the issue’s “Letter from the Editor,” “We weren’t quite sure we would make it to the end of the year, but here we are: strong as ever; stronger, even. Our passion and motivation have not flickered out, if anything they have grown.” I’m grateful not only for the publication of my flash fiction amid all of the challenges Tianna and her team faced, but I’m also grateful for the story’s early release. I admire Tianna and her team for their hard work, tenacity, and persistence. I hope you will join me in supporting the lovely literary magazine they’ve worked so hard to create.

Writing Update: Where I am Now

Happy New Year! I realized, in the midst of the mad rush of my life, that I’ve failed to provide a general update on my writing journey for a while now. As a thank you for continuing to follow my blog, I wanted to provide a general overview of the progress I’ve made this past year. I also wanted to briefly discuss the projects that are in the works right now.

Progress

The highlight of my year was the release of Space, Collisions. It’s really exciting that the print version is out too and is available for purchase at The BookwormIndieBound, Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and other fine retailers. Many of you know that I’ve already received reviews from Meredith Allison (my friend) and Renwick Berchild (a book reviewer) about the micro-chapbook. I also did an interview with Sarah Foil. If you’d like to receive a copy of Space, Collisions for review, I’d encourage you to check out the publicity page at Heavy Feather Review, the review queue at decomP, or reach out to PRISM International.

To all who have read and reviewed my micro-chapbook, whether on Goodreads or elsewhere, I thank you. I work to publish my writing because I want to connect with readers. I’m grateful for the encouraging reviews and personal notes I’ve received so far. I appreciate all of the readers who decided to give my work a chance.

My individual stories have also taken off in 2018. It’s been a blessing to work with so many different editors. Thanks to them, my flash fiction was published this year in Varnish Journal (sadly, now defunct), Laurel Magazine, The Bookends Review, Apparition Literary Magazine, The Fancy Arm Hole Series Number 1 (Likely Red Press), Crack the Spine, NewfoundFathom, Nice CageBarren Magazine, and Rythm & Bones. I have more flash fiction that will appear in Laurel Magazine and Rythm & Bones in 2019. Notably, the editors of Nice Cage were kind enough to reach out to me for work. This is something that’s never happened to me before, except for with vanity publishers (of which I almost always turn down). So, in short, it’s been a fantastic year for publishing short fiction. I hope that you will support all of these hard-working editors and check out all of the writing featured in these lovely literary magazines and journals.

And since we’re discussing editing, it’s probably a good time to mention that I’ve been working as a fiction editor at Green Briar Review. I was recently appointed to the position and it’s been wonderful so far reading the fiction that comes in. I’ll also be contributing to the blog in the future, so watch for reviews on fiction chapbooks. I can’t wait to see what the future holds. To all who have submitted or will submit: thank you for trusting us with your work.

Another exciting project that I volunteered for was the Forward anthology. I worked as a reader, which proved to be an awesome experience. The anthology will feature flash fiction by writers of color. I can’t wait until its March release! You can pre-order the book here. I hope you all will support this wonderful project, as well as the forces behind this movement for change.

In-Progress

The largest project I’m working on right now is a novel (or novella). You may have seen that I took a hiatus from Twitter—at times, unsuccessfully—to focus on the book. I have had trouble with my longer projects and buried many of my failed novels in the filing cabinet. Though I have many short stories in-progress, I’m going to shift focus this year away from shorter works and focus mostly on this long project. I hope this novella (or novel) will be my first true success with a book-length manuscript.

Goals for this Year

This year will be a challenging one. My husband, pets, and I are all moving to Louisiana in April. The first half of 2019 will be chaotic, but we’ll manage. We always do. But because I know it’s going to be a challenging year, I’m giving myself a bit of a break. I’ll only have three major goals next year:

  • Finish my novel (or novella) and thoroughly revise at least once
  • Complete my classics reading challenge for 2019
  • Find a way to plug into the literary community in Louisiana

I’m probably going to be conservative about reviews this year, sharing my thoughts mostly on Goodreads. I’ll also do away with the “Quick Reads” section of my blog to save time. Most of my energy will be devoted to the novella (or novel). But I’ll still share updates about my progress on my blog, so I hope you’ll continue to check in this year.

What are your goals for 2019? Feel free to share in the comments. However you decide to challenge yourself, I wish you a year of peace and joyful reading!

I talked to the wonderful booksellers at The Bookworm today, and they’ve agreed to sell Space, Collisions! For those of you who’d like to buy a physical copy of the micro-chapbook, I’d encourage you to pick it up at this lovely independent bookstore. You can buy the micro-chapbook online or find it on their local author shelf inside the brick-and-mortar store. The Bookworm has a wonderful track record of housing and promoting local authors. It would mean a great deal to me if you’d consider checking out this family-owned business, especially during your holiday season shopping.

Cover Art by Jennifer Potter

Recently, I had the pleasure to chat with Sarah Foil, a friend of mine from Salem College. She interviewed me about Space, Collisions. You can find our discussion on her blog today. And do check out the rest of her blog, if you pop over there. She’s a writer, editor, and media manager and her reviews and interviews are always interesting.

Quick Reads (October 2018)

So many wonderful magazines and journals released new content this month and it was hard to keep up. I haven’t read through all the things I want to, but I’m sure I can sneak more in while procrastinating during National Novel Writing Month!

Anyway, here is the list of everything short I read this past month. Please remember: this list is not necessarily meant to act as a review, a show of favor, or a “best of” list. Feel free to share your own findings in the comments!


A Summoning in Section 292.1.J-P” By Anya Josephs (Green Briar Review)
[Note: This is where I volunteer as a fiction editor. Please consider sending us your own excellent creations!]

When Czechoslovakia Was Still a Country” By Tad Bartlett (Green Briar Review)
[See note directly above this.]

4P16.3” by Maya Alexandri (The Forge Literary Magazine)

Snap Bam Boom” by Robert Mangeot (The Forge Literary Magazine)

Zero Tolerance” by Jayne Martin (Barren Magazine)

Toy Box” by Asher (Barren Magazine)
[Note: “Buried in the Ground” by yours truly is in this issue of the magazine!]

Barnlights” by Amanda Crum (Barren Magazine)

A Girl Buys Lilies for Herself” by Priyanka Sacheti (Barren Magazine)

Sharp Parables” by Emily Osborne (Barren Magazine)

How to weave a blanket out of horsehair and spidersilk” by Sonja Swift (Barren Magazine)

The Horror of Party Beach” by Dale Bailey (Lightspeed)
[I listened to this story via the Lightspeed podcast.]

The Miracle Lambs of Minane” by Finbarr O’Reilly (Clarkesworld Magazine)
[I listened to this story via the Clarkesworld Magazine podcast.]

Midwestern Women: An Essential Reading List” by Meghan O’Gieblyn (Literary Hub)

The Routine” by Marie McKay (Rhythm & Bones)

Unravelling” by A.L. Bradshaw (freeze frame fiction)

Waiting for Nothing to Happen” by Caroline Langston (Image)

Dionysus Promised to Let You Have Another Glass” by Chloe N. Clark (Likely Red)

The Atomic Clock” by Michael Grant Smith (Spelk)

Crazy in Love” by Anita Goveas (Pixel Heart Literary Magazine)

Letter of Recommendation for a Basic Male MFA Applicant” by Emma Brewer (McSweeney’s Internet Tendency)

How to Build a Dream World” by Ruth Joffre (Electric Literature)

The Power of Cautionary Questions: Neil Gaiman on Ray Bradbury’s ‘Fahrenheit 451,’ Why We Read, and How Speculative Storytelling Enlarges Our Humanity” by Maria Popova (Brain Pickings)

Into the Wash” by Mitchell Grabois (Blue River)

The Hill” by Laura Huey Chamberlain (jmww)

The Things I Miss the Most” by Nisi Shawl (Uncanny Magazine)
[I listened to this story via the Uncanny Magazine podcast. It is part of the Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction issue.]

Convalescence” by Alicia Cole (Uncanny Magazine)
[I listened to this poem via the Uncanny Magazine podcast. It is part of the Disabled People Destroy Science Fiction issue.]

“Catalyst” and “Reaction” by M. Stone (Nice Cage)
[My short story, “All the Waves Resound,” is also in this issue of the journal!]

New Old” by Tara Isabel Zambrano (The Southampton Review)

Emily As We Turn Off the Sound of Monday Night Football” by Darren C. Demaree (The Stay Project)

The Horror of the Unknown: Songs of a Dead Dreamer and Grimscribe by Thomas Ligotti” by David Peak (Electric Literature)

Hi, friends! “Buried in the Ground” is up at Barren Magazine today if you’d like to read it.

Here is an excerpt:

You begin with the vegetable garden because it’s the likeliest place to bury something. You slip the blank paper into your bag and get to work, not daring to put it down until your dad goes back into the house. The ground is still soft in the garden from spring’s tilling and makes the digging less painful. But when you dig up the carrots, you regret your decision. It isn’t until you’re under the soil that you realize the vegetables are still slivers of orange root, born too early. The leafy carrot tops trick you, making the roots appear more mature than they really are.

I hope you’ll check it out! If you do, thanks for reading.

I recently had a short story accepted for publication at Barren Magazine. “Buried in the Ground” is one of the darkest stories I’ve ever written and it hits very close to home for me. Like other writers such as Eleanor Kriseman and Melanie Finn, I sometimes write about child abuse and neglect to grapple with and discuss these very real issues. In addition, “Buried in the Ground” also deals with animal abuse.

Fiction can often foster empathy and that’s my goal here. While many of my other stories tend to suggest abuse is happening, this one deals with it directly. It’s my way of acknowledging that, tragically, not all child abuse or animal abuse cases have happy endings. To put the reader in the shoes of the child, I also used the second person. Even though this is a work of fiction, it is a difficult story and I recognize that it will not be one that everybody can read. I respect the decisions made by readers who choose to abstain. If you do choose to read it, then I thank you.

And don’t forget there are wonderful organizations out there, such as The Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline, that help with real cases of child abuse. Let’s all work together to create a more loving and safe world for everyone.

“Buried in the Ground” will appear in Issue No. 3 of Barren Magazine, which is scheduled to release October 20.

September Mini-Reviews

Autumn has appeared suddenly here in Nebraska and the cooler weather is a perfect excuse to sit inside and read. We’re also less than a month away from NaNoWriMo, which is a good reminder of just how hard it is to write a book, let alone a good book. I always try to keep this in mind when I review things: authors are working hard, usually for years, to get their books out there and in front of readers. It’s a tough business and a bad review can be rather detrimental.

At a Vase of Wildflowers, I always try to be honest about my feelings concerning the books I read, while still focusing on its positive aspects. That’s not every reviewer’s goal and I respect and understand that. But when you visit my blog, I hope that you will always consider giving the books I review a chance, no matter how I feel about them. It would be boring if we all loved the same things. And isn’t that what literature is really all about: freedom and the right to choose and think for oneself?

So with that in mind, the following reviews will cover what worked well in the books I read. If you wish to discuss what didn’t work in the books or what you enjoyed about the books, then I’d encourage you to comment on this post. (Mild spoilers may follow.)


The Art of PerspectiveI decided to continue reading Graywolf Press’s “The Art of” series with Christopher Castellani’s The Art of Perspective. It was another smash hit for me, even if I didn’t agree with everything Castellani said. I’m happy to have read it. All the thanks to my local librarian for making me aware of this series about the craft of writing. I hope to be able to continue it. I’m seriously considering reading them all. Let’s hope they stock the rest at the Bellevue Public Library in the near future.

Synopsis from the Graywolf Press website:

A writer may have a story to tell, a sense of plot, and strong characters, but for all of these to come together some key questions must be answered. What form should the narrator take? An omniscient, invisible force, or one—or more—of the characters? But in what voice, and from what vantage point? How to decide? Avoiding prescriptive instructions or arbitrary rules, Christopher Castellani brilliantly examines the various ways writers have solved the crucial point-of-view problem. By unpacking the narrative strategies at play in the work of writers as different as E. M. Forster, Grace Paley, and Tayeb Salih, among many others, he illustrates how the author’s careful manipulation of distance between narrator and character drives the story. An insightful work by an award-winning novelist and the artistic director of GrubStreet, The Art of Perspective is a fascinating discussion on a subject of perpetual interest to any writer.

What worked well:

  • Even when I disagreed with Castellani on a particular idea, he was such an eloquent writer that anything he wrote nearly swayed me to his viewpoint. It’s always nice to know that the one instructing you about writing is a good writer. Castellani proves it in this book, penning elegantly wrought and veracious chapters, which are as much moving as they are instructive.
  • I had a professor in my graduate program that tried to argue that all points of view worked in the exact same way and that it didn’t matter which one was chosen for a story. I’ve never agreed with that idea and I think this book works to show why the point of view we choose for a story does matter. This is a very valuable tool for writers: the ability to understand the nuances of the different perspectives.

Who should read The Art of Perspective:

  • Writers, especially fiction writers
  • Professors and teachers who want to educate their students about perspective
  • Those who enjoy books about the craft of writing
  • Readers who like to study particular literary movements and their impact on literature

Building FictionAnother craft book I finished this past month was Building Fiction by Jesse Lee Kercheval. I read parts of this book in graduate school for a class. After I graduated, I decided I wanted to read the entire thing. I read the book from start to finish, including the chapters I’d already studied. It was worth revisiting, and I’ll probably reference it again at different points in my career, but it did take a while to get through it because of the textbook-like feel of the prose.

Synopsis from the University of Wisconsin Press website:

No one looks at structure like Jesse Lee Kercheval. She builds a work of fiction just as an architect would design a house—with an eye for details and how all parts of a story or novel interconnect. Even with the most dynamic language, images, and characters, no piece of fiction will work without a strong infrastructure. Kercheval shows how to build that structure using such tools as point of view, characterization, pacing, and flashbacks. Building Fiction will help you envision the landscape of your fiction and build great stories there.

What worked well:

  • This is an excellent guide for beginning fiction writers, with many things that are valuable for the intermediate writer. Honestly, even for the most experienced, it’s nice to reexamine these basic elements. Kercheval is thorough and gives ample examples, including ones from her own books. She even has a very valuable chapter on experimental writing—a topic often ignored by other craft books I’ve read.
  • What I appreciate about Kercheval’s writing is the candidness of it. She doesn’t pretend her advice is the only advice out there, nor does she suggest that it’s the only correct way of doing things. This is important because she encourages writers to find their own voices and to write what works for them.

Who should read Building Fiction:

  • Fiction writers
  • Professors and teachers who want to teach their students how to write fiction (especially novels and short stories)
  • Those who enjoy books about the craft of writing
  • Writers who enjoy extensive, time-consuming exercises

Milkyway HitchhikingI realized, with horror, that I hadn’t read any comics or graphic novels lately. I decided to obtain a library card from La Vista’s public library (I can as an employee of the college I work for) and check out what they had to offer. The first book I choose to read was a manga titled Milkyway Hitchhiking, Vol. 1 by Sirial. While its slice-of-life storytelling left much to be desired, there were still some lovely things happening in this volume.

Synopsis from the Yen Press website:

There are as many people on Earth as there are stars in the sky. Milkyway–a peculiar cat with a pattern of the Milky Way splashed across her back–travels across time and space; sometimes to observe, other times to interact with an unfolding story. From Sirial, the creator of One Fine Day, comes the full-color tale of Milkyway hitchhiking across the bright stars of people’s lives, loves, tears, and laughter.

What worked well:

  • The art in this is gorgeous. What’s even cooler than that is that the art style changes somewhat with the different stories. I’m no expert, but it felt like only a truly skilled artist could pull off so many styles so flawlessly.
  • The fantasy and sci-fi aspects presented in this book are fascinating. They include everything from shape-shifting to robots. And everything is super cat focused, which I can’t help but love.

Who should read Milkyway Hitchhiking, Vol. 1:

  • Fans of manga with beautiful artwork
  • Readers who like quick stories connected by a single character
  • Those who enjoy fantasy and science-fiction
  • Readers who enjoy intermixed light and dark stories

The BunkerThe other comic book I picked up was The Bunker Vol. 1 by Joshua Hale Fialkov (writer) and Joe Infurnari (artist). I love apocalyptic stories but I felt more confused by this one, due to both the storytelling and art style, than satisfied.

Synopsis from Oni Press website:

On their way to bury a time capsule, five friends – Grady, Heidi, Natasha, Daniel, and Billy – uncover a metal bunker buried deep in the woods. Inside, they find letters addressed to each of them… from their future selves. Told they will destroy the world in the very near future, the friends find, over the next few days, growing further and further apart. Though they’ve been warned against making the wrong choices, how do they know what the right ones are? Can the future really be changed, or will an even darker fate engulf the world? Collects the first four issues of the ongoing series.

What worked well:

  • There’s definitely a lot here to keep readers interested: letters from the future, time travel, and crops that kill, to name a few.
  • The art style compliments the horror aspects, especially that of the impending apocalypse.

Who should read The Bunker Vol. 1:

  • Fans of apocalyptic stories
  • Comic book readers who can appreciate the art style
  • Readers who like science-fiction
  • Those who are patient enough to figure out where the story will lead

BONUS TITLES!

I read #41 and #42 in the Ghost City Press micro-chapbook series. You can find all of them here.

Blood & WhiskeyAnd remember that book I was a beta reader for? Guess what, you can pre-order it now! It’s called Blood & Whiskey and it was written by my friend Meredith Allison.

Blood & Whiskey thrilled me. Meredith Allison uses famous criminals like Al Capone, Dean O’Banion, and Tom Dennison and expertly plays them against dynamic fictional characters of her own creation. It’s a daring and exciting book, filled with all of the adventure and peril of the Roaring Twenties.

 

Quick Reads (September 2018)

Here is the list of everything short I read this past month. Please remember: this list is not necessarily meant to act as a review, a show of favor, or a “best of” list. Feel free to share your own findings in the comments!


Rabbit Hat” by Marcus Slease (Nice Cage)

Watch Them Glitter” by Tommy Dean (Ellipsis Zine)

Comfort, Dogs” by Matthew Fiander (Barren Magazine)

Fantastic Fabrics” by A.E. Weisgerber (Barren Magazine)

Chinese Bleeding on a Friday” by Peter Ngila (Barren Magazine)

Sweet Violets” by A.E. Weisgerber (New Flash Fiction Review)

The Funny Thing” by Michelle Ross (Nashville Review)

All of #22, Volume XII, Issue 1 of the Whitefish Review

Salt and Calcium” by Sarah Roth (Columbia Journal)

One Lifetime With a Stranger” by Matthew Caldwell (The Esthetic Apostle)
[Note: Matthew attended Creighton University’s MFA program around the same time I did.]

Unmentionables” by Kaitlyn Andrews-Rice (Paper Darts)

Back Talk” by Danielle Lazarin (Copper Nickel)

Nebraska” by Brian Hoey (New Orleans Review)

A Girl Walks on the Moon” by Ruth Joffre (Vestal Review)

Muriel” Elizabeth O’Brien (Newfound)

The Difference Between Reading and Reading Well” by Collin Huber (Fathom Magazine)

A Son” by Rachel Rodman (Apparition Literary Magazine)

Inversions” by Meghan Xanthos (The Bookends Review)

Mullenville, Population 82” by Sandra K. Barnidge (Allegory Ridge)

Wings and Sand” by Sean Patrick Whiteley (Obra/Artifact)

Counting Elephants” by F.E. Clark (Rhythm & Bones)

The Farewell” by Gem Caley (The Ginger Collect)

Out and Out” by Latifa Ayad (The Masters Review)

Quick Reads (August 2018)

Here is the list of everything short I read this past month. Please remember: this list is not necessarily meant to act as a review, a show of favor, or a “best of” list. Feel free to share your own findings in the comments!


All of The Conium Review: Vol. 5

Why Christians Should Read More Fiction” by Paul Anderson (RELEVANT Magazine)

“The Fool’s Stone” by Aubry Kae Andersen (Analog Science Fiction and Fact)

An elf in the witch-garden” by Kate Garr (Rhythm & Bones)

Thaumatrope” by Christopher Iacono (Rhythm & Bones)

forgiving mistakes i’ve made” by Linda M. Crate (Rhythm & Bones)

Today” by Maddie M. White (Rhythm & Bones)

A Dungeon Open House” by Ben Niespodziany (Train)

And the Hole Never Heals” by Ryan Habermeyer (Bat City Review)

Dragon Princess” by Michael Chin (Cherry Tree)
[Note: I read the excerpt available online.]

Big Bad Wolf” by Terrance Wedin (New South)

Unicorn” by Philip Dean Walker (Big Lucks)

This and That” by Ricky Garni (Big Lucks)

Rhode Island Red” by Michael Kimball (Big Lucks)

The Wardrobe” by Aysegul Savas (The Adroit Journal)

Apology” by Anne Rasmussen (Jellyfish Review)

Uncle Soot” by Joshua Jones (Midwestern Gothic)
[The round 1 winner for the journal’s annual summer flash fiction series]

Perseids” by Madeline Anthes (Midwestern Gothic)
[The round 1 runner-up for the journal’s annual summer flash fiction series]

Day in the Manner of Magritte” by Austin Sanchez-Moran (Maudlin House)

Bees” by ​​Melissa N. Warren (Gordon Square Review)

Me and You and Zvonimir” by Casey Whitworth (Green Briar Review)

Arsonist With Unlit Match” by Matt Fiander (Barren Magazine)

The House Mourns Alone at Midnight” by Maryse Meijer (Outlook Springs)

Koi Pond” by Cathy Ulrich (Outlook Springs)

SPACE, COLLISIONS Available for Print Pre-Order!

The print version of Space, Collisions is now available for pre-order! If you like brief stories, then this is the collection for you. The micro-chapbook will be 6″ x 9″ with saddle stitch binding. 

Advanced praise:

“Three perfectly paced and elegantly written stories that leave the reader breathless and pensive at once.” —Meredith Allison, author of Blood & Whiskey

“L. N. Holmes has a talented pen and a great imagination. . . .” —Renwick Berchild, Nothing In Particular Book Review

Synopsis:

Space, Collisions is a micro-chapbook containing three brief stories. In “When Continents Collide,” a man waits on the shores of the Outer Banks for the collision of the North American and African continents. “Trace” focuses on the intimate secrets shared between one pining woman and her self-destructing lover. In “Spacefall,” two scientists take a break from work to drive to the countryside and bask in their friendship. Each installment in this short collection offers motifs of physical distance and intimate connection. Overall, the stories emphasize the common longing to overcome the space that divides.

Print options:

The micro-chapbook will be on sale September 19, 2018 with pre-orders available now. *Personalized messages are an option. A single copy of the micro-chapbook is **$3.99.

Individuals, booksellers, general retailers, and other interested parties may submit orders to LeeAnn Adams (leeann [dot] n [dot] holmes [at] gmail [dot] com). Please include in your email the quantity of micro-chapbooks desired, any preferred ***printing and shipping methods, shipping address, PayPal address, and any personalization requests. Invoices will be processed through PayPal. Wholesale discounts are available through IngramSpark Distributors (ISBN: 9780692165065).

Ebook options:

Digital micro-chapbooks are still available through Ghost City Press.

Continue reading

stories, microchapbook, small press, fiction, flash fiction, Space, Collisions, L. N. Holmes, short story, print version

Here is a sneak peek of the print cover for Space, Collisions. This a screenshot, so it’s a bit grainy.

It’s been nearly a month since Ghost City Press released the digital version of Space, Collisions. Thanks to Jennifer Potter, the print cover is shaping up nicely as well. Stay tuned for the release date! And a big thanks to my amazing cover artist.

I received some really great news last night. Rhythm & Bones Lit agreed to publish two of my flash fiction stories! You will be able to read “Shadows Cannot be Seen in the Pitch-Black” in issue three of the magazine and “How to Suffocate a Shark” in issue four. Many, many thanks to Tianna, Renee, and Charlie for the kind acceptance letter. I can’t wait!

My good friend Meredith Allison reviewed Space, Collisions and interviewed me about the collection. Her thoughts and questions are totally spot on. She’s one of my writing heroines and I can’t wait for her upcoming historical fiction novel, Blood & Whiskey, to be released.

You can read the review and interview here. I hope you’ll check it out!

Little Writer With Big Kick: L. N. Holmes’s Otherworldly Collisions

Renwick Berchild posted a lovely review of Space, Collisions over at the Nothing in Particular book blog. I’m so grateful for her honest thoughts and for the way she associated Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time with my micro-chapbook. I am overjoyed! I hope you will check it out, dear readers.

Nothing In Particular

Like many with and before me, one of my first compelling reads as a youth was A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. In the beginning chapters, there is a most enthralling moment – illustrated by an ant and a piece of string – where Mrs. Who, Mrs Which, and Mrs Whatsit explain how a clever loophole in time and space allows them to travel the universe.

A Wrinkle in Time_ant Illustration of ‘the wrinkle’ – Source: A Wrinkle in Time

We know it as “the tesseract”, or, “the fifth dimension”. In reality i.e. geometry, a tesseract is the four-dimensional analogue of the cube, consisting of 8 cells, 24 faces, 32 edges, and 16 vertices. It is, in short, a cubic prism. But at this explanation, the tesseract looses its mystique and magic. In the book we understand the tesseract only as this: The way to bridge the gap between worlds.

In reading L…

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Quick Reads (July 2018)

Here is the list of everything short I read this past month. Please remember: this list is not necessarily meant to act as a review, a show of favor, or a “best of” list. Feel free to share your own findings in the comments!


Pillow Talk” by Lori DeSanti (Blue Earth Review)

Ice” by Marianne Villanueva (Bellingham Review)

Ohio Deathbed, 1990” by Greg Marzullo (Arkana)

This Must Be the Place” by Jeffery Helton (Appalachian Heritage)

Of Leaf and Limb” by Hamilton Kohl (The Arcanist)

Bloom” by Lori Sambol Brody (matchbook)

Coloring Book Sky” and “Holy Noodles” by Elizabeth Elliott (Remington Review)
[Note: Elizabeth graduated from the Creighton MFA program before I did.]

Tips on Discipline” by Jeff VanderMeer (wonderbooknow.com)

Jeff VanderMeer on the Art and Science of Structuring a Novel” by Jeff VanderMeer (Electric Literature)

Rebuking A Sexist Prayer” by Diane J. McDougall (Fathom Magazine)

Every Bright Patch of Green” by Rachel Joy Welcher (Fathom Magazine)

Birds of a Feather” by Tianna Grosch (Okay Donkey)

The Piano Room” by Lily Wang (Cosmonauts Avenue)

July Mini-Reviews

Despite how busy July was, I managed to read twenty-one books and micro-chapbooks. Reading helps me mellow out when I’m stressed, and I was pretty stressed this month, so it doesn’t surprise me how voraciously I read. I’m also beta reading a novel for a writer that I deeply admire and I can’t wait for that book to be released into the world. What have you read lately that’s gotten you excited?

Now for the feedback. The following reviews will cover what worked well in the books. If you wish to discuss what didn’t work in the books or what you enjoyed about the books, then I’d encourage you to comment on this post.

Without further ado, here are the mini-reviews for this month. (Mild spoilers may follow.)


Train DreamsI first read Train Dreams during a class I took at Creighton University. I was surprised by how much I disliked the book and wanted to give it another chance by reading it again. While my boredom was not completely alleviated with the second read, I did manage to find some things I enjoyed about the novella.

Synopsis from the Macmillan website:

Denis Johnson‘s Train Dreams is an epic in miniature, one of his most evocative and poignant fictions. It is the story of Robert Grainier, a day laborer in the American West at the start of the twentieth century—an ordinary man in extraordinary times. Buffeted by the loss of his family, Grainer struggles to make sense of this strange new world. As his story unfolds, we witness both his shocking personal defeats and the radical changes that transform America in his lifetime. Suffused with the history and landscapes of the American West, this novella by the National Book Award-winning author of Tree of Smoke captures the disappearance of a distinctly American way of life.

What worked well:

  • What I came to enjoy with the second read was Johnson’s use of imagery. His descriptive language at certain points is spot on and beautiful, especially of landscapes and manmade structures.
  • Another nice thing about Train Dreams is that it examines a time period of significant change in the northwestern United States. The logging scenes alone are brutal, terrifying, and fascinating to read.

Who should read Train Dreams:

  • Historical fiction fans
  • Readers who enjoy man versus nature stories
  • Those who like books about hard work
  • Readers who like to read about feats of engineering

Abridged ClassicsI received a copy of Abridged Classics by John Atkinson from my best friend for my upcoming birthday. Honestly, it’s just a short and fun little joke book that I read in its entirety immediately after my friend gave it to me. I loved it.

Synopsis from the HarperCollins website:

A collection of irreverent summations of more than 100 well-known works of literature, from Anna Karenina to Wuthering Heights, cleverly described in the fewest words possible and accompanied with funny color illustrations.

Abridged Classics: Brief Summaries of Books You Were Supposed to Read but Probably Didn’t is packed with dozens of humorous super-condensed summations of some of the most famous works of literature from many of the world’s most revered authors, including William Shakespeare, Charles Dickens, Emily Brontë, Leo Tolstoy, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, J.R.R. Tolkien, Margaret Atwood, James Joyce, Plato, Ernest Hemingway, Dan Brown, Ayn Rand, and Herman Melville.

From “Old ladies convince a guy to ruin Scotland” (Macbeth) to “Everyone is sad. It snows.” (War and Peace), these clever, humorous synopses are sure to make book lovers smile.

What worked well:

  • The brief summaries are hilarious. Truly, they’re really funny. I think I laughed at every single one of them.
  • The illustraitions add to this humor. If you’ve ever read any classic books, go check this one out.

Who should read Abridged Classics:

  • Fans of classic books
  • Those who enjoy jokes about classic books
  • Those who like books that you can read really quickly
  • Readers who enjoy funny illustrations

The Half Drowned KingI listened to The Half-Drowned King by Linnea Hartsuyker on audiobook through OverDrive. The novel started out strong and then kind of disentegrated for me. Still, the interesting parts of the book are definitely worth talking about.

Synopsis from the HarperCollins website:

An exhilarating saga of the Vikings that conjures a brutal, superstitious, and thrilling ninth-century world and the birth of a kingdom—the debut installment in a historical literary trilogy that combines the bold imagination and sweeping narrative power of Game of Thrones, Vikings, and Outlander.

Centuries ago, in a blood-soaked land ruled by legendary gods and warring men, a prophecy foretold of a high king who would come to reign over all of the north. . . .

Ragnvald Eysteinsson, the son and grandson of kings, grew up believing that he would one day take his dead father’s place as chief of his family’s lands. But, sailing home from a raiding trip to Ireland, the young warrior is betrayed and left for dead by men in the pay of his greedy stepfather, Olaf. Rescued by a fisherman, Ragnvald is determined to have revenge for his stepfather’s betrayal, claim his birthright and the woman he loves, and rescue his beloved sister Svanhild. Opportunity may lie with Harald of Vestfold, the strong young Norse warrior rumored to be the prophesied king. Ragnvald pledges his sword to King Harald, a choice that will hold enormous consequence in the years to come.

While Ragnvald’s duty is to fight—and even die—for his honor, Svanhild must make an advantageous marriage, though her adventurous spirit yearns to see the world. Her stepfather, Olaf, has arranged a husband for her—a hard old man she neither loves nor desires. When the chance to escape Olaf’s cruelty comes at the hands of her brother’s arch rival, the shrewd young woman is forced to make a heartbreaking choice: family or freedom.

Set in a mystical and violent world defined by honor, loyalty, deceit, passion, and courage, The Half-Drowned King is an electrifying adventure that breathtakingly illuminates the Viking world and the birth of Scandinavia.

What worked well:

  • The Half-Drowned King starts off with one of the most exciting openings I’ve read in a while. Oar walking alone is enough to spark my interest but then you throw in an attempted murder and an encounter with the Norse gods and the hook becomes irresistible. The historical details and mythology that Hartsuyker adds in brings a lot of life to the book.
  • Also, the exploration and adventures within the novel create some exciting scenes and plot points. The sailing scenes were of particular interest.

Who should read The Half-Drowned King

  • Readers who like Norse mythology
  • Fans of historical fiction
  • Readers who like adventure and exploration
  • Those who enjoy books about betrayal

Land of Love and DrowningI bought Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique a while ago. It sat for far too long in my to-be-read pile before I finally picked it up. I’m so incredibly happy to have read a novel about the U. S. Virgin Islands, a place that almost never appears in the fiction I read.

Synopsis from the Penguin Random House website:

A critically acclaimed debut from an award-winning writer—an epic family saga set against the magic and the rhythms of the Virgin Islands.

In the early 1900s, the Virgin Islands are transferred from Danish to American rule, and an important ship sinks into the Caribbean Sea. Orphaned by the shipwreck are two sisters and their half brother, now faced with an uncertain identity and future. Each of them is unusually beautiful, and each is in possession of a particular magic that will either sink or save them.

Chronicling three generations of an island family from 1916 to the 1970s, Land of Love and Drowning is a novel of love and magic, set against the emergence of Saint Thomas into the modern world. Uniquely imagined, with echoes of Toni Morrison, Gabriel García Márquez, and the author’s own Caribbean family history, the story is told in a language and rhythm that evoke an entire world and way of life and love. Following the Bradshaw family through sixty years of fathers and daughters, mothers and sons, love affairs, curses, magical gifts, loyalties, births, deaths, and triumphs, Land of Love and Drowning is a gorgeous, vibrant debut by an exciting, prizewinning young writer.

What worked well:

  • The way Yanique incorporates moments of important U. S. Virgin Islands history is really wonderful. For example, the “free beach” movement is something I knew nothing about, and it appears—fictionalized—in the pages of Yanique’s book. The protests she includes leading up to the Open Shoreline Act are some of the most elegantly written scenes I’ve ever read about protestors.
  • Also, the relationships between the siblings is really fascinating—at times cringeworthy—and ultimately well-done.

Who should read Land of Love and Drowning:

  • Readers who want to learn more about the U. S. Virgin Islands
  • Fans of historical fiction
  • Those who are prepared to read about taboo topics
  • Readers who like novels about families

The Blurry YearsOf course I had to read another Two Dollar Radio book this month. This time I chose The Blurry Years by Eleanor Kriseman. All I can say is wow; this book left me conflicted in all the right ways.

Synopsis from the Two Dollar Radio Website:

The Blurry Years is a powerful and unorthodox coming-of-age story from an assured new literary voice, featuring a stirringly twisted mother-daughter relationship, set against the sleazy, vividly-drawn backdrop of late-seventies and early-eighties Florida.

Callie—who ages from six to eighteen over the course of the book—leads a scattered childhood, moving from cars to strangers’ houses to the sand-dusted apartments of the tourist towns that litter the Florida coastline.

Callie’s is a story about what it’s like to grow up too fast and absorb too much, to watch adults behaving badly; what it’s like to be simultaneously in thrall to and terrified of the mother who is the only family you’ve ever known, who moves you from town to town to leave her own mistakes behind.

With precision and poetry, Kriseman’s moving tale of a young girl struggling to find her way in the world is potent, and, ultimately, triumphant.

What worked well:

  • Kriseman covers topics such as the neglect of a child, alcohol abuse, and sexual trauma without flinching. To depict and deconstruct these things within fiction is so important and should be discussed.
  • The main conflicts center around other characters using Calliope and Calliope figuring out who she is and what she wants. It’s a great example of a novel about self-discovery and how we form our own identities.

Who should read The Blurry Years:

  • Readers who enjoy coming-of-age books
  • Those who appreciate difficult topics being faced head-on in fiction
  • Readers who enjoy books about Florida
  • Fans of books about mother/daughter relationships

The GunnersI chose to listen to the audiobook of The Gunners by Rebecca Kauffman after I saw it appear on my OverDrive app. Frankly, I think the book’s structure, conflicts, and characters are messy, but there were a lot of good things about the novel too.

Synopsis from the Counterpoint Press website:

Following on her wonderfully received first novel, Another Place You’ve Never Been, called “mesmerizing,” “powerful,” and “gorgeous,” by critics all over the country, Rebecca Kauffman returns with Mikey Callahan, a thirty-year-old who is suffering from the clouded vision of macular degeneration. He struggles to establish human connections—even his emotional life is a blur.

As the novel begins, he is reconnecting with “The Gunners,” his group of childhood friends, after one of their members has committed suicide. Sally had distanced herself from all of them before ending her life, and she died harboring secrets about the group and its individuals. Mikey especially needs to confront dark secrets about his own past and his father. How much of this darkness accounts for the emotional stupor Mikey is suffering from as he reaches his maturity? And can The Gunners, prompted by Sally’s death, find their way to a new day? The core of this adventure, made by Mikey, Alice, Lynn, Jimmy, and Sam, becomes a search for the core of truth, friendship, and forgiveness.

A quietly startling, beautiful book, The Gunners engages us with vividly unforgettable characters, and advances Rebecca Kauffman’s place as one of the most important young writers of her generation.

What worked well:

  • The Gunners incorporated some moments of philosophical debate that I truly appreciated. For example: Can a person be objectively bad or good and how do our perceptions and opinions influence such labels? These questions are most often brought up in the dialogue, which was also a strong point of this novel.
  • Kauffman is also an adept humorist and I found myself laughing out loud at many of the characters’ hilarious actions and one-liners.

Who should read The Gunners:

  • Readers who enjoy books about childhood friends
  • Fans of books with wonderful humor
  • Those who enjoy books that explore what love is
  • Those who are prepared to read about taboo topics

BONUS TITLES!

I read micro-chapbooks #22 through #36 in the Ghost City Press Summer Micro-Chapbook Series. You can find all of the available ones here.

Also, Space, Collisions released this month! I hope you’ll check it out.

Cover Art by Jennifer Potter

Hey, friends! My micro-chapbook, Space, Collisions, is available now! I’m thrilled to have my first ever micro-chapbook released into the world. I hope you’ll check it out. If you’re on Goodreads, remember you can add it to your shelves here. I’m working on a print version too, which will be available soon. For those of you who check it out, thanks for reading!

And don’t forget that the cover art was made by the wonderful Jennifer M. Potter. You can find more of her work here. I hope you’ll choose to support this fantastic artist!

I’m so grateful for the support I received from the good people at Ghost City Press. Being a small part of the 2018 summer micro-chapbook series is a huge blessing. A massive thank you to everyone who helped me with the stories and their publication. This profession is tough, but your kindnesses have made the burden much lighter.

June Mini-Reviews

June turned out to be a busy month for me. July is shaping up to be busy too. I’m having trouble reading books and writing my novel while taking care of so many other things, but I managed to read two books this month anyhow.

The following reviews will cover what worked well in the books. If you wish to discuss what didn’t work in the books or what you enjoyed about the books, then I’d encourage you to comment on this post.

Without further ado, here are the mini-reviews for this month. (Mild spoilers may follow.) 


Best Christian Short StoriesMy professors in my undergraduate and graduate courses taught solely secular fiction. What was lacking for me—in a major way—was fiction that aligned with my faith tradition. I couldn’t find any character that accurately represented my faith in secular fiction. In the present, I’m seeking out Christian fiction like water in a desert. As a reader, I’m looking for characters like me—for accurate representation. As a writer, I’m seeking the elements that mix to create a good Christian short story.

Bret Lott takes some liberties with The Best Christian Short Stories collection. He added in some secular fiction that seemed to exemplify Christian values and ideas. Still, the anthology intrigued me. Here was something I was missing. Here was something I desperately needed to read for the sake of my own identity. “Best” stories or not, it was important to me. While I enjoyed the anthology, I’m still struggling to find that accurate representation, even within the pages of this book. Still, it was worth reading.

Synopsis from the Thomas Nelson website:

The first volume in a collection of contemporary fiction that combines the artistry of critically accaimed writers with a clear Christian worldview.

From Homer Hickam, the best-selling author of Rocket Boys–which later became the movie October Sky to editor and contributing best-selling author Bret Lott, this collection spans a talented community writing an eclectic blend of fiction. Each piece stands alone as stellar fiction. And each piece confronts us with who we are and forces us to look deeply at the human condition. From the dirt lanes of North Africa to the suburbs of California, exuding lightheartedness and profundity, hilarity and tragedy, these stories will take you on a fresh and entertaining journey.

What worked well:

  • With all stories labeled “Christian fiction,” I’m skeptical about what elements of the story align with my faith. Even though some of these stories were meant to be secular, I would agree with Lott that many of them do align with Christian values and ideas. I think there are exceptions within this anthology. For example, there is a story where a character is being racist. Now, why the author chose to make this character a racist is unclear to me. It adds nothing to the story. Sure, the character is deeply flawed, but there are no repercussions for the character due to his racist actions and thoughts. So that particular character does not align with the Biblical, Christ-like attitude toward humanity, of which Christians are supposed to adhere to. It soured the story for me. However, what is good and what did work were many of the other stories and their characters. There were many Christian and non-Christian characters that did exhibit Christ-like attitudes, values, thoughts, and actions and their flaws made sense within the context of the story. This is what really made this anthology work for me.
  • Another thing that worked well was the multifariousness within this anthology. The stories were told from various perspectives of Christianity (Catholic and Protestant) and also from a few secular perspectives. It was a nice mix of different points of view, of different styles, and of different ways to understand Christianity and what it can mean to the people who practice it.

Who should read The Best Christian Short Stories:

  • Fans of Christian fiction
  • Fans of literary fiction
  • Those who love reading short stories
  • Readers who’ve enjoyed Bret Lott’s work as a writer and editor 

NeversI’m always seeking out flash fiction collections to read. My local librarian, also a flash fiction writer, suggested Nevers by Megan Martin. She was even kind enough to let me borrow her copy of the book. My librarian friend has a fetish for whimsy and snark and Nevers definitely exemplifies such things. I find a great deal of snarky writing to be trite and this book was no exception. Still, I’m glad I tried it and there were things about Martin’s work that I definitely enjoyed.

In lieu of a synopsis, here are some quotes of praise about Nevers from Caketrain’s website:

‘Megan Martin’s Nevers is my favorite kind of book. Its stories are familiar and distant, one never existing without the other. It’s that feeling you get when you are suddenly inside yourself, looking around, going, Hey, that’s my coffee mug. That’s my pen. I am me. It’s like standing in your childhood home as the walls are replaced with snapshots of the same walls. This is a book, only it has a mouth.’ —Lindsay Hunter, author of Don’t Kiss Me

‘In Megan Martin’s fantastic Nevers, we encounter the situation of a book that is conscious of itself. This seems right, because the life in its pages is conscious of itself, too—all at once, from a dozen slip-sliding angles, the whole a shimmering phantasm held aloft by an act of voice so clean and real it can squash your heart. Here’s me as I was reading: big stupid openmouthed grin and the thought, You’re reading this awesomeness right now, before others get to.’ —Scott Garson, author of Is That You, John Wayne?

What worked well:

  • Martin’s fictional narrator tends to have beef with poets. There are quite a few funny sections in these fictions where the narrator pokes fun of the poet characters in her life. Sometimes the poke is a fairly gentle jab: “An old professor and his new mistress sit in a circle of even older white guy poets talking about how amazing it is that because of the internet there are no ideas anymore, and what a relief it is that they’ll never have to come up with an idea again” (69). Other times the poke is more like a stab: “But what would make anyone want to see a poet’s body? Or the sort of swimsuit a poet would wear?” (89). The humor is off-color and no-holds-barred but usually works in the way a comedian delivers self-deprecating punchlines.
  • If you’re teaching a class on outrageous hyperbole, this is your book. The flash story “Cinders” takes the cake (pun intended) for me,  but “Forever Bloodcloud” and “Warning Label” are also good examples. Most of the hyperbole is so outrageous that you can’t help but laugh.

Who should read Nevers:

  • Fans of snarky and off-color humor
  • Readers who enjoy irreverent narrators
  • Those who appreciate an abundance of hyperbole
  • Readers of flash fiction 

BONUS TITLES!

I read micro-chapbooks #5 through #21 in the Ghost City Press Summer Micro-Chapbook Series. You can find all of the available ones here. There will be more as the summer continues, including my own micro-chapbook, Space, Collisions (available July 19)!

Quick Reads (June 2018)

Wow, May and June are stellar months for flash fiction. There were a lot of contest and special issues that were recently published—the majority of which I haven’t had the chance to read yet. Here are just a few recommendations for flash lovers: Wigleaf’s Top 50SmokeLong Quarterly’s contest issue, and the FlashFlood blog.

Anyway, here is the list of everything short I read this past month. Please remember: this list is not necessarily meant to act as a review, a show of favor, or a “best of” list. Feel free to share your own findings in the comments!


Drift” by Toti O’Brien (Bridge Eight)

Fruit” by Jacquelyn Bengfort (matchbook)

Why I Write Sad Stories” by Kevin Fitton (Ruminate blog)

Gator Butchering For Beginners” by Kristen Arnett (Recommended Reading Commuter)

The Vector of Our Love” by Elizabeth Shack (freeze frame fiction)

An Ocean This Big” by Christine Hennessey (Monkeybicycle)

The Mansion of Endless Rooms” by L Chan (Syntax & Salt)

Upon Discovering That Cows Can Swim” by Santino Prinzi (Jellyfish Review)

I Open I Wince” by Shane Kowalski (Peach Mag)

Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid (The New Yorker)

The Huntress” by Sofia Samatar (Tin House Online)

There is No Albuquerque” by Kathy Fish (Newfound)

A Man Named Magritte” by Abby Burns [Bending Genres (50mm Microfiction Contest first place)]

Happiness is Gold” by Jean Reyes [Bending Genres (50mm Microfiction Contest, second place)]

Sisyphus Speaks” by Jennifer Wortman [Bending Genres (50mm Microfiction Contest, third place)]

Wings of Desire” by Jude Higgins [Bending Genres (50mm Microfiction Contest, honorable mention)]

Tiny House” by Nancy Stohlman (New Flash Fiction Review)

A Husband Should Be Eaten and Not Heard” by Megan Giddings (Split Lip Magazine)

Three poems by Erin Pulsipher (Déraciné Magazine)
[Note: Erin graduated from the Creighton MFA program the same time I did.]

Full” by Carolina VonKampen (Déraciné Magazine)

The Soul Sucker” by Andrea Salvador (Déraciné Magazine)

All of Crack the Spine Issue 238
[Note: My flash fiction story “While Taking Photographs in Nepal” is in this issue!]

Final Girl Slumber Party” by Meghan Phillips (Barrelhouse)

Hospice” by Tara Isabel Zambrano (The /tƐmz/ Review)

Filaments of Air” by Tommy Dean (FlashFlood)

Grateful” by Laura Pearson (FlashFlood)

This Isn’t as Much Fun as I Thought It Would Be” by Mary Lynn Reed (FlashFlood

A Day for Watching Birds” by Anna Vangala Jones (FlashFlood)

Whale Fall” by Alvin Park (SmokeLong Quarterly)

Nocturne” by Leslie Marie Aguilar (The Common)

Snowstorm” by Tara Isabel Zambrano (Atticus Review)

Shoot by Grace” by Grace Campbell (Jellyfish Review)

The Rats” by Blake Middleton (Hobart)

The Devil and Ellen and Charles” by Mary Clemens (Hobart)

Greetings From” by Melissa L. Amstutz (Tin House Online)

All of the Penny Fiction in From the Depths Issue 15

Surprise! “One Woman’s Junk” was selected for Newfound’s annual print issue.

Here are some details about No. 4 from Newfound’s website:

  • …featuring the best of vo. 8 + poetry by our 2017 Anzaldúa Poetry Prize finalists.
  • Full color, perfect-bound, 56 pages, 8.5″ x 11″ on acid-free and FSC-certified paper.
  • Purchase also allows three PDF downloads.

Many thanks to the hardworking editors at Newfound for allowing my flash fiction to be part of the print issue. It’s truly an honor to be side-by-side with so many talented creators.

I hope you all will check it out! Thanks so much for reading if you do.