January Mini-Reviews

For 2018, I hope to read at least 52 books by the end of the year. This may seem like a low goal, so it may also come as a surprise to you that I’m a slow reader, considering how much I read. However, my undergraduate and graduate courses have helped me nail the novel-per-week schedule in the past, so I think 52 books is doable for me.

At the end of the month, as a response to each book, I plan to write mini-reviews. The reviews will consist of mainly what worked and links to the book. If you wish to discuss what didn’t work in the novel—or better yet, your own reading goals for the year—I’d encourage you to comment on this post.

Without further ado, here are the mini-reviews for this month. (Mild spoilers may follow.)


novel, literary fiction, science fiction

The Salt Line by Holly Goddard Jones

How could a dystopian junkie pass up The Salt Line? I couldn’t of course. Holly Goddard Jones had me at deadly ticks and outdoor excursions.

Summary from the Penguin Random House website:

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Why I’m Happy Reading Dystopian Novels

apocalypse, dystopia, novels, speculative, fiction, L. N. Holmes, writing, reading

No, I’m not a cruel robot propagating the idea that humans should be subservient to machines (OR AM I?). Simply put, reading dystopian novels makes me happy. Before you judge me, hear me out.

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The Genre Debate and Why it (Does)n’t Matter

Legend, The Maze Runner, The Hunger Games, California, Black Moon, Station Eleven, novel, book, novels, books, dystopian
Copyright L. N. Holmes (LeeAnn Adams)

Many have heard of the genre versus literary fiction debate. It’s old news — not even news. So why should we still be interested in it?

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