Update: New Writings and Current Projects

F(r)iction #5, Tethered by Letters, literary journal


typewriter-1031024_1920Whoever said the summer months were for vacation probably wasn’t a writer (or an editor). My graduate school classes don’t start up again until late August, but I’m as busy as I’ve ever been. Don’t misunderstand—I’m not complaining. This past month especially has been wonderful! What’s more, I have some new published stories up and some fantastic opportunities to share.

New Flash Fiction Stories:

As some of you already know, I have two new published stories that are now available to read online.

  • “Trace” can be found at Vestal Review online (issue 49) and it is forthcoming in print (issue 47). This story deviates greatly from my normal style. I wrote this to see if I could stretch myself as a writer. Though it may not be what you expect, I hope you enjoy it.
  • “Spacefall” is the fourth installment of a Dually Noted group writing project. The writers used the phrase “Hold this—it’s supposed to relieve stress” as a prompt. It was really fun to write and I hope you enjoy it. It’s a personal favorite of mine.

Other Available Writings:

  • “Articulating Agony: The Writer as Antihero” is up on the Blue River blog. While my attempts at being funny may be somewhat laughable… I hope you enjoy it anyway. I would encourage everyone to read the writings of my fellow staff members as well.
  • Helly Luv: The Pop Star Fighting ISIS has surfaced on GERM Magazine. I found this spectacular woman via social media and decided to do a brief feature. She’s a pretty cool artist.
    • As a note: My women’s college and women writers series will be continuing according to one of the editors. You can find a complete list of my GERM Magazine contributions here.

Forthcoming Writings:

  • Interviews:
    • Roger May at Change Seven
    • Molly Rose Quinn at Tethered by Letters
    • Tyler Barton at Tethered by Letters
  • War Song” in The Stark via Wisehouse/Editorial l’Aleph
  • Book Reviews:
    • All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders at Tethered by Letters
    • UHaul by Emily Ramser on my blog

Opportunities for Readers and Writers:

I’ve had some exciting adventures with Tethered by Letters lately. As a summer intern for this amazing nonprofit, I have seen first hand how wonderful Dani, Leah, and the staff are to their writers, readers, and business partners. If you’re curious check out what they offer:

  • Readers, participate in the #LitStory Series giveaway for a chance to win a copy of F(r)iction #2, #3, or #4! Here are the details.
  • Free Editing Program: The FEP is a great opportunity for writers. Feedback from an editor is often hard to come by and it can help a writer transform a piece from a fifth draft to a polished work. This program is indeed free once you join the Tethered by Letters community (also free). Here are the details.
  • F(r)iction #5: The anticipated release of this beloved journal of fine art and literature is about to happen—and let me tell you, it is gorgeous. Tell your friends. Tell your friends’ friends. Tell the dude crossing paths with you on the sidewalk—you get the idea. The Kickstarter is up!
  • Dually Noted: Do you want to be part of a group writing project? Submit your story by Friday for your chance to be part of the current TBL story cycle. Submissions are voted upon by a select group of editors and then the chosen story is posted on the website for readers. Try your luck, writers! Submit your awesome 500 word addition—details here—and tell them I sent you.

As fiction editor for Blue River, I’ve been reading some exciting work from graduate students that have submitted to our journal. The great news is that there is still time to submit for the chance to win the Blue River Editors’ Award of $500 (USD). The editors will be giving feedback for each submission. We’re looking for great stories from graduate writers for the first issue and—if you’re a writer in a graduate writing program—we hope to see your work!


Thanks for tuning in and, as always, thanks for reading!

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Where You Should Be and When: Urgent Literary Events

Blue River, book drive, donations, literary journal, literary magazine, booksHi friends! There is an explosion of awesome literary events happening in my neck of the woods (and a few other places) that you need to know about. Here’s a quick run down, starting with the most urgent.

At the University of Nebraska Omaha (Omaha, NE):

Tonight 7 pm, Twyla M. Hansen and Tim Hunt will give a reading at the Barbara Weitz Community Engagement Center. Learn more here.

At Salem College (Winston-Salem, NC):

Tonight at 7 pm, Incunabula is releasing their newest installment of the magazine. Go support some emerging writers if you’re in the area. Learn more here.

At the Joslyn Art Museum (Omaha, NE):

The last Fair Use Reading of the year will be at the Joslyn Art Museum tomorrow night. Get there at 6:30 pm for seats. Make sure to bring books for Blue River‘s book drive! Meredith Spears, Nathan Sindelar, and Shelby Snedeker will be reading.

Enter to win an autographed copy of Pas de Deux: Part One (online):

You’ve got about a day before this opportunity is lost. Put your name in that hat. Also, check out Wynter S.K. and Pas de Deux.

At Salem College (Winston-Salem, NC):

A collegiate publications and journalists conference? Who dare take on such a momentous task? None other than Emily Wonder Woman Ramser of course. Check out this great opportunity coming up April 30. You can learn more here and—never fear—still register by emailing Emily at emily.ramser@salem.edu.

At Pageturners Lounge (Omaha, NE):

Another installment of the literary pub quiz is happening May 4 at 8 pm. Don’t forget to bring your books to donate to Blue River‘s book drive! Learn more about genius and event organizer Theodore Wheeler and about the event.

A Flash Fiction Class for $0.99 (online)?

Yes, the rumors are true, so hurry and sign up. Ilana Masad is teaching this course. Learn more about it here.

Blue River Book Drive (Omaha, NE):

Blue River is seeking book donations for an upcoming fundraiser. Please help us out if you can. Drop them off at Creighton University or at the Fair Use Reading or during the Literary Pub Quiz. Thanks for supporting literature!

Writers and Editors and Publishers! Oh my!: My First AWP Experience

Literary Friction, F(r)iction, F(r)iction #2, "When Continents Collide", L. N. Holmes, speculative fiction, magical realism, short story, AWP off-site event

As many of you know, I attended the Association of Writers and Writers Programs (AWP) conference in Los Angeles, California this year—an experience that was partly funded by the generous Creighton University. It was my first time attending an AWP conference and it was amazing.

My fellow writers Nate Sindelar, Maranda Loughlin, Arnie Hermes, and I embarked upon a cross-country adventure to the land of sunshine and starlight. Despite the madness of driving twenty-two hours and thirty-six minutes straight (roughly thirty hours after some stopping and set-backs), we decided to be brave and to make it a priority to see some of the scenery of the western United States. As expected, it was an exciting and perilous adventure.

Nebraska, birds, travel, AWP conference, LeeAnn Adams, L. N. HolmesWe began the first part of our journey through Nebraska in the early morning, the Monday before the conference. It seemed even the birds had gotten the message that now was the time to travel. As I had the privilege to sit in the back of the car for a while, I used that time to catch up on some shut-eye, to read a bit more of Ready Player One, and to—of course—write a bit. It seemed like very little time before we were entering Colorado, one of my favorite states in the U. S.

Colorado, Rocky Mountains, AWP, LeeAnn Adams, L. N. HolmesAs we climbed in elevation, I looked forward to seeing the Rocky Mountains again. The first time I saw the Rocky Mountains was at the Rocky Mountain National Park during a first year anniversary retreat with my husband. They were awe-inspiring then and they were still awe-inspiring the second time around. The mountains first appeared on the horizon like low-hanging clouds. As we drove closer, the sheer cliffs and evergreen trees, the snow caps and valleys, all came into clearer view.

We stopped in Denver, Colorado to peek our head into a bookstore (true to our nature) and for some food. However, only one could order the fish and chips. Nate and Arnie decided to participate in the 76th Hunger Games.

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Back on the road, we eventually drove far enough to reach Utah. In terms of fun, Utah was the opposite of Colorado. At night, heading down a mountain, it began to snow. Fortunately, we were using Maranda’s four-wheel-drive Jeep. Unfortunately, I was the one who had to drive through it. The roads and visibility became bad enough that I had to pull over. Nate informed us that the snowfall might not end for a couple of days. Nate decided to take over the driving. The rest of us watched for cars and other potential hazards. Traumatized, sleep-deprived, and terrified, we drove onward.

When the snow finally let up, Nate pulled over and allowed me to drive again. I made it only so far before we hit another pocket of the snowstorm and we were back to the dangerous conditions of before. This time there was a snow plow ahead of us. I decided I needed to go slow anyway and followed the plow for a while. I relied on Flogging Molly, Queens Of The Stone Age, Metallica, and Rush to keep me awake and alert—although, in retrospect, this might have been a bad choice because it made me want to drive faster than I was going and also seemed to heighten the drama of the event. Alas, I regret nothing (mainly because I didn’t kill us or wreck the car).

When I feared I would fall asleep if I went on any longer, I finally gave up the wheel to Maranda, who eventually became too tired as well. We parked the car briefly and got a few hours of much needed rest (I may or may not have had my mouth attractively hanging open in my sleep). Then we were off again.

Las Vegas, Nevada, desert, city, LeeAnn Adams, AWP conference, L. N. HolmesIMG_3233We were about to enter Las Vegas as the sun was peeking over the horizon. I didn’t have my contacts in at this point (I was not driving) and so everything was a bit hazy for me. What I remember is the desert in its darkness and then all of a sudden there was what looked like a massive grid of lights sprawling before us. We were tired, and not so interested in Vegas’s flashy advertisements at the moment, so we drove straight through. I did manage to snap a blurry picture or two.

From there we drove through the desert to California. I remember thinking as we were winding through the mountains that everything was so beautiful. The rock faces, the wildflowers, the array of colors, the sunshine—I felt as if, maybe not so surprisingly, I’d stepped into a movie. I wondered when the Indominus Rex would come storming down one of the mountainsides or when Bumblebee and Megatron would make a crash-landing into the middle of the freeway.

IMG_3267 (1)When we finally got to LA, I met our host and Nate’s friend Nathan (yes, I know many people with Nate/Nathan names). He was a stellar guy, let me tell you, and even more so for letting us crash for free in his living room for nearly a week. We found out his roommate, Tevin, who happened to be an accomplished slam poet and in the know about the local writing scene, was also wicked cool.

Nathan took us to some great places in downtown LA. We got some amazing coffee, excellent food, and—of course—visited a bookstore. The Last Bookstore was probably one of the coolest places I’ve ever had the privilege to visit. Set up like a sort of maze (the upstairs is called the labyrinth), there were all kinds of books in nearly every genre. The horror vault and the bench made out of an old, Chevy pickup truck tailgate sealed my love for this place—but there were all kinds of cool displays that made the store feel downright magical. There were even readings going on when we visited, which were entertaining and often comical. I think I would be happy living my last days at The Last Bookstore during the end of the world.

The next day we went to Donut Friend in Highland Park and then onward to Venice Beach and Hollywood. It was an amazing day, filled with great food and wonderful company.

We also set up the booth for the AWP book fair. We were representing the Creighton University MFA program, Blue River, and Brighthorse Books. We even had the chance to pass out information about Theodore Wheeler, an accomplished Creighton MFA alumnus.

AWP conference, LA, California, LeeAnn Adams, L. N. Holmes

Arnie, me, Nate, Maranda

Thursday was when the real madness began and it continued through Friday and Saturday. AWP is a huge conference with more than 12,000 attendees and it only gets bigger as the years go on. The Los Angeles Convention center was huge, but they also had panels in the Marriott across the street. You almost had to take a whole day to check out all of the book fair booths. It was pure bliss to see so many people that cared about the written word and the power of poetry and prose. I met some really fantastic people, from the very accomplished to the new professional. There were so many on-site and off-site events that one could only attend a small fraction of them.

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From left: the moderator (I apologize for forgetting her name), Emily St. John Mandel, Kelly Link, and Ruth Ozeki

I really enjoyed the speculative, young adult, and publishing industry panels I attended. There was a great deal to learn about the politics of writing and publishing. I’ll never forget seeing three of my favorite authors—Kelly Link, Emily St. John Mandel, and Ruth Ozeki—on stage during the Penguin Random House Speakers Bureau panel.

 

Literary Friction, F(r)iction, F(r)iction #2, "When Continents Collide", L. N. Holmes, speculative fiction, magical realism, short story, AWP off-site event

Nate, Maranda, Arnie, and my professor Mary Helen Stefaniak came to support me. Nate took this photo. 

I also had the privilege Thursday night, thanks to the amazing editors of F(r)iction, to be part of an AWP off-site event called Literary FrictionAndrew McFadyen-Ketchum was our host and a representative of all three organizations that put on the event—F(r)ictionFloodgate Poetry Series, and poemoftheweek.org. I was in the company of some serious talent—Anders Carlson-Wee and Kai Carlson-Wee, F. Douglas Brown, Geffrey DavisNicky Beer, Scott O’ConnorPaisley RekdalCampbell McGrath, Simone Muench, and Lynn Emanuel. Their work was at times breathtaking, at times heart-wrenching, and at times rather hilarious. It was so wonderful I had to keep telling myself it wasn’t a dream and that I was really at These Days Gallery, reading an excerpt of “When Continents Collide” alongside these amazing writers.

Friday evening, I had the pleasure of meeting up with one of the professors who taught many of my creative writing courses at Salem College, Aimee Mepham (read “The Blacklisting of Sweet Kiss” and “Raving Ones“). Catching up with her over dinner was such a blessing. Her endless hard work and dedication to her craft really inspire me.

When Sunday rolled around, it was time to head back to Nebraska. We bid farewell to Nathan and Tevin and began the journey home. We decided to take a southern route to avoid any more snowy mountain passes. On the way, we couldn’t resist making a stop on the edge of the Mojave National Preserve.

Then we traveled through Arizona—stopping for dinner in Flagstaff to check out the scene and another bookstore—, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Kansas. I felt very blessed to see parts of this beautiful country that I had never seen before.

My first experience with the AWP conference was wonderful. I understand there are those who do not enjoy it and I empathize. But I can honestly say it was one of the best decisions of my life to go to this conference. I owe a lot of thanks to a lot of people and I hope by now they know I’m grateful. I will take the things I’ve learned and use them to help others and myself as we all continue our literary journeys.

 

Upcoming Events and Another Writing Update

Writing Before Work

Finding the time is hard, so I often have to make time. Today, I’m working on revisions before heading off to work.

Can you tell this graduate student is a busy person? I apologize for not updating more often. But don’t worry, this blog isn’t going away. I’m merely working hard on my short stories and novel (and working hard every moment in between). I hope that I’ll have some great stuff to present to you within the next few years.

I wanted to let you know of some exciting upcoming events, but first let me start with some general writing updates.

I have two new projects rolling with Germ Magazine and Change Seven Magazine. One of them is available right now for readers, the other is forthcoming.

For Germ Magazine, I wrote a brief essay on the magical elements present in two books: The Cure for Dreaming and Belzhar. My main goal with this article was to talk about the importance of magical realism and to generate interest among young adults for the genre. Also, I wanted to give a rather brief history of the genre’s origins.

The article for Change Seven Magazine is a forthcoming interview with Ann Pancake. If you’re not familiar with Strange As This Weather Has Been, Ann’s novel, you should put it on your to-read-immediately list. It’s a beautiful work of art. It’s also a successful political novel. If you want to find out more, watch the Change Seven Magazine site for the interview. I’ll also post a link on my Twitter feed when it is available to readers.

As far as my fictional writing goes, I’ve got two short stories I’m revising and I’m working hard on my novel. Workshops for the piece have been intense, but I’m closer to a finished project.

How about you, writing friends? How are your projects going?

Upcoming events:

AWP Conference
The annual conference for the AWP organization will be held in Los Angeles this year. A few of my brave classmates and I will be heading to the sunny city to represent the Creighton University MFA program and Blue River. We hope to see you there!

F(r)iction, Tethered by Letters, AWP, offsite event, 2016, These Days GalleryLiterary Friction
This is an offsite AWP event. I will be reading part of my story that was featured in F(r)iction #2Talented artists like Paisley Rekdal, Campbell McGrath, Lynn Emanuel, Geffrey Davis, Simone Muench, F Douglas Brown, Anders Carlson-Wee, Kai Carlson-Wee, Nicky Beer, and Scott O’Connor will be performing as well.

Pageturners Literary Pub Quiz (Vol 2, Ed 4)
Interested in book trivia? Writer Theodore Wheeler is having another literary pub quiz at Pageturners Lounge and this time the quizmasters are Blue River‘s managing editors.

Judging for the 2016 Art Young Memorial Award for Poetry

Art Young, poetry, Garbanzo Literary Journal, Good Morning, contest, writing

Art Young (source)

I’m grateful to Marc and Ava (Mr & Mrs Garbanzo) for a great many things. They were the ones who allowed my writing to appear in Garbanzo Literary Journal and then again in Good Morning. So when they asked me to help judge the 2016 Art Young Memorial Award for Poetry, I felt honored.

When I received the poetry packet, however, I found the task to be rather difficult.

I had stumbled upon a pool of talented poets and now had the monumental task of voting for the entry that seemed to “deserve” the prize. I read each poem carefully—studying each word, each punctuation mark, each space, each sensory detail, etc. I was very impressed with the entries. After much painstaking effort and consideration, I offered my votes, which would be added to the votes of the other judges.

I have been on the other end of this process too. I have been the writer submitting work to contests, winning few and losing many. That’s why I so meticulously read and analyzed each poem—because I would want any judge in a writing contest to do the same for me.

January 15, Marc and Ava announced the winners:

The 2016 Art Young Memorial Award for Poetry goes to Terry Severhill for “Beneath the Shadow of the Sun”. An honorable mention goes to Emily Vieweg for “Shadows”. Thanks to all the storytellers who were a part of this event.

Both pieces will appear in the March 1st 2016 issue of Art Young’s Good Morning.

Congratulations to Terry and Emily, and thanks to those who allowed me to read their wonderful poetry submissions.

After the Holidays: A Writing Update

There is no rest for the working writer—but I’m not complaining. A lot of good has happened lately. I owe you an update.

I’m going to do this list style. Here goes:

Judging the Teen Poetry Bash

Saturday, December 12, I went to listen to some talented teens speak their piece at the Teen Poetry Bash, held at the Omaha Public Library. Because of my past work with the Nebraska Writers Collective as a Louder Than a Bomb judge, I was asked to be one of the judges for this competition as well. It was such a privilege to be on the panel and to listen to some local talent. I was impressed with all the poets that chose to speak their words. It was a fun event—one that will only keep going if these young ones keep participating, I’m told.

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The finalists are chosen and invited to participate in the second round.

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The winners pose with OPL’s representative.

My Interview with The Other Stories

Thanks to the wonderful editors at Tethered by Letters and writer Ilana Masad, I was recently featured on The Other Stories podcast for my story “When Continents Collide” from F(r)iction #2. It was really fun (and I was super nervous)! You can listen to the story and my interview here.

My Professor Won an NEA Fellowship

I am blessed to be learning from amazing writers and professors at Creighton University. Brent Spencer, Mary Helen Stefaniak, Susan Aizenberg, and—this semester—David Mullins. You may have heard in recent news that David Mullins won a National Endowment of the Arts fellowship. I’m pretty stoked to be participating in his workshop soon. All of my professors have really challenged me so far. I’m so excited to start classes again.

Los Angeles and AWP

That’s right, ladies and gents, I’m going to L.A. in March/April for the Association of Writers & Writing Programs conference. It’s going to be a wild drive there and back (and probably on the L.A. streets). Four of us are going to make the pilgrimage. I’ll live tweet some of the madness. If you’re going to the conference, come check out the Blue River booth and say hello!

Writing for Change Seven

Recently, Change Seven editor Sheryl Monks has asked me to write for their magazine. I will be doing this in addition to my work at Germ Magazine. My work for Change Seven is still in the beginning stages, however, so I’ll have more concrete updates for you as I work on my first assignment.


Well, that’s all folks! I hope all of you had happy holidays (or happy recent days, if you don’t celebrate holidays). As always, thanks for reading (or listening to podcast audio).

Upcoming Events

Friends, I wanted to let you know of some upcoming readings I will be participating in. They’re going to be really fun. Please come out and join us if you are close to the area. I’d love to chat with you.

  • Soundz of Freedom presents: Freedom Expressions ~ As seen through the Eyes of a Veteran
    • Thursday, December 10
    • 6-10 p.m.
    • Ralston Arena, 7300 Q Street, Ralston, Nebraska
    • Admission: $12 in advance/$15 day of event
    • I will be playing a very small part in this large event. Around 8:45 p.m. I will be reading a pre-selected work of literature that coincides with the theme for the night: “Seeing the stories of our Veterans through their eyes”
  • Fair Use Reading Series Continued
    • Thursday, December 17
    • 6:45 p.m.
    • Abbott Lecture Hall in the Joslyn Art Museum, 2200 Dodge Street, Omaha, Nebraska
    • Admission: free
    • I will be reading my speculative fiction story “When Continents Collide”, published in F(r)iction #2

 

reading, Creighton University, MFA, writing, fiction, poetry

The Second Fair Use Reading featuring Erin Pulispher, Allison Hraban, and me.