Little Writer With Big Kick: L. N. Holmes’s Otherworldly Collisions

Renwick Berchild posted a lovely review of Space, Collisions over at the Nothing in Particular book blog. I’m so grateful for her honest thoughts and for the way she associated Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time with my micro-chapbook. I am overjoyed! I hope you will check it out, dear readers.

Nothing In Particular

Like many with and before me, one of my first compelling reads as a youth was A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle. In the beginning chapters, there is a most enthralling moment – illustrated by an ant and a piece of string – where Mrs. Who, Mrs Which, and Mrs Whatsit explain how a clever loophole in time and space allows them to travel the universe.

A Wrinkle in Time_ant Illustration of ‘the wrinkle’ – Source: A Wrinkle in Time

We know it as “the tesseract”, or, “the fifth dimension”. In reality i.e. geometry, a tesseract is the four-dimensional analogue of the cube, consisting of 8 cells, 24 faces, 32 edges, and 16 vertices. It is, in short, a cubic prism. But at this explanation, the tesseract looses its mystique and magic. In the book we understand the tesseract only as this: The way to bridge the gap between worlds.

In reading L…

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